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CSULB Fibers Lecturer Christy Matson in LA Times article

Posted on August 21, 2014 by School of Art

Weaver Christy Matson prefers when art can be made out of whole cloth

BY KIMBERLY STEVENS

August 15, 2014

A spirit of experimentation, one foot in the past and one in the future, has set Christy Matson apart as a weaver.

“It’s unusual these days not to be working on a commission,” Matson says, standing next to a counter brimming with colorful balls of yarn, her white and aqua blue Jacquard loom gleaming in her tiny backyard studio in Highland Park. She shares her home with her husband, artist Ken Fandell, and 2-year-old daughter, Lake.

“But I love to work on things that don’t have a destination. It’s when true experimentation happens,” Matson says.

Amid a weaving renaissance, Matson’s work stands out. Using yarn with varying textures in soft, muted colors and hand weaving on a highly technical loom, she creates textiles that are more like abstract or Modernist paintings. Whether prepping warps, tying knots, dyeing yarn, winding skeins, drawing and painting, researching or drafting weave structures, she pays meticulous attention to detail.

But it is the process of hand weaving, just a small portion of how her time is spent, that inspires her passion.

“You take a real leap of faith as you go along because you can only see about 8 inches of what you are working on at a time, which can be really exciting, but it can also be really maddening,” Matson says.

After a rocky beginning with a floor loom and a weaving class in college (she hated it and gave the loom away), she was introduced to the Jacquard loom because she thought she might go into textile design. It allows creating cloth that has organic curving and lines, and she felt like it created a bridge between the historical aspect of hand weaving and a more contemporary way of working that uses digital technology. “It was like a light bulb went off,” she says. “It blows the doors off what you can weave.”

(For complete article and images, please click here: http://www.latimes.com/home/la-hm-christy-matson-20140816-story.html )

 

 

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